Answer to Riddle #84: Twiddled Bolts

84. Two identical bolts are placed together so that their helical grooves intermesh. If you move the bolts around each other as you would twiddle your thumbs, holding each bolt firmly by the head so that it does not rotate and twiddling them in the direction shown, ill the heads a) move inward, b) move outward, or c) stay the same distance a from each other?
Interlocking Bolts orbiting each other

An unusual puzzle this because your ability to answer depends on not your pure intelligence but your ability to visualize things in the abstract. It's also not the slightest bit quant. I read this puzzle the other day, and I've been thinking of a way to explain it, I think I've come up with a good plan, let's see if you agree:

Before reading the answer can I interest you in a clue?

Consider the arrangement below: a special bolt with just a flange on the end interlocked with a regular bolt

It shows rather than two interlocking bolts, one bolt and a sort of specially designed thing with a singular thread in a circle around it.

It's reasonably easy to tell by intuition that given the orbital direction that the stud at the top (currently,) will move to the right.

Now consider the arrangement below... a special bolt with just a flange on the end interlocked with a regular bolt, the other way round from before

The stud will also move to the right.

So if both are moving to the right, at the same speed, then there is no relative motion, (save the rotation,) at all.

Finally as the convincer I've included a video...

To see the video you'll have to click here. The video will appear below, or to view it in YouTube you can click click here. Apologies for this nonsense, it's because you're on a mobile device and Google thinks this page is not mobile friendly if I embed YouTube videos using their own code.



I know, I know, I twiddled the bolts in the opposite direction. Hopefully you can see that if the don't move relative to ach other when twiddled one way they wont when twiddled the other.

Puzzle comes from a book, My Best Mathematical Puzzles by Martin Gardner








© Nigel Coldwell 2004 -  – The questions on this site may be reproduced without further permission, I do not claim copyright over them. The answers are mine and may not be reproduced without my expressed prior consent. Please inquire using the link at the top of the page. Secure version of this page.
 


PayPal
I always think it's arrogant to add a donate button, but it has been requested. If I help you get a job though, you could buy me a pint! - nigel






This Website Uses Cookies

To increase the functionality of the site. The cookies I apply do not uniquely identify you, by continuing to use this site you agree to let me place a cookie. I also have advert and analytics providers, my advertising provider (Google,) does provide personalised adverts unless you specify otherwise, with them. For more information click here.x